The ‘Writing Prime Time’ System

Not long ago I wrote a post about a few great ways to get creative. One of the techniques I came across was called the ‘biological prime time’, developed by Sam Carpenter in his book Work the System. He decided to log his productivity, focus and motivation throughout the day so that he could work out his most ‘productive time’.

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Credit: Chris Bailey

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10 Reason to Read Children’s Books Instead of ‘Grown-Up’ Books by Isabelle Sudron

Nerdy Book Club

Some may think that you grow out of kid’s books as you get older. There are those that think they are predictable and unrealistic. There is even the notion that children’s books are not challenging enough for our big old brains. However, there are many of us that feel otherwise, myself being one them. Children’s fiction can be some of the most honest, witty and humbling stories you’ll ever read.

  1. They’re more intelligent

a wrinkle in timeIf you place a confusing, fictional situation in front of an adult, then they will immediately start to question things. How did she get from there to there? Why did he do that, when he could have done this? Surely, that isn’t possible?

Children, on the other hand, have big, fantastic imaginations with no limits, as do the books they read. If you place an unusual, fictional situation in front of them, it won’t take them…

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[GP] 5 Stages of the Writer’s Twitter Break

This week, I’m lucky enough to hage a guest post from Lucy Mitchell, thriller writer and blog author of BlondeWriteMore.

If you’re a writer and you haven’t visited Lucy’s blog yet, you must! Her hilarious, wonderful and candid posts include tales of terrible feedback from loved ones, tips to get your creativity flowing and occassional agony aunt responses.

She has been kind enough to share her thoughts on a weakness of many writers: the Twitter Break!

Credit: BlondeWriteMore Twitter
Credit: BlondeWriteMore Twitter

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10 Writer Stereotypes that are (Mostly) Wrong #Writer #guestblogger

Here’s my guest blog for the wonderful BlondeWriteMore!
Pop back here on Thursday to check out her brilliant return of a guest blog :)

BlondeWriteMore

Isabelle Sudron, author and blog author of ‘Sudrobelle’ dropped by the Blondewritemore office last week offering to do a Guest Post. The entireBWM team erupted into cheers and shouts (with so many on the team the noise was deafening).

She describes herself as a’writerholic’and shares our passion for list posts.

Without further ado let me hand you over to Isabelle:

10 Writer Stereotypes that are (Mostly) Wrong

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The majority of films and books about writers seem to follow a very rigid pattern, usually following a self-hating, male writer who drinks a lot and isn’t good with people. (If you don’t believe me, check out IMDB’s list of the best 80 films about writers*.) Having an array of friends who write myself, it’s clear to me that we’re a diverse, nutty bunch that rarely fit that stereotype. So, I decided to set the record straight. Here’s a few stereotypes…

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5 Things You Must Ask Your Protagonist

Creating a protagonist comes with all sorts of frustration and confusion. As the author of our characters, we often feel that we know exactly who they are without having to explicitly state the facts. We seem to think that every quirk and nuance of our character simply eminates from the page without any effort. #TruthBomb – Err, not so much!

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